James Joyce and the Comstockery of internet.

Fuck the censors.

–Steve Fly

One of Comstock’s first actions was to obtain the passage of a strong federal indecency law–which was then used to pursue authors and publishers of novels including works by Balzac and Tolstoy. This law today is largely dead on the books though never repealed, as a result of many leading free speech cases. Senator James Exon of Nebraska, in proposing the Communications Decency Act in 1995, reinvigorated the Comstock law in two ways. His vague Internet indecency language echoed part of the wording of the original Comstock law. Even more outrageously, the CDA extended portions of the Comstock law to information transmitted over the Internet. As a result, some long-disused language banning the distribution of abortion information became federal law again–until the Justice Department stood up in federal court in Brooklyn and announced that the government would not attempt to enforce this provision of the CDA.
The CDA restored to federal law a crime involving the distribution of “indecent” material even though it had literary or artistic value– and allowed a jury to make the decision based on “contemporary community standards.” Effectively, a law of the type under which “Nausicaa” was deemed too dirty to distribute was back on the books for the first time in many decades. Could an online version of Joyce be censored again?–http://www.spectacle.org/398/gertie.html

We can escape history and break out of the infinite series of repeated folly by understanding freedom of speech to mean protecting the next James Joyce– in print, on the Web, or in a medium undreamed of yet.–http://www.spectacle.org/398/gertie.html 

Zhanmusi Qiaoyisi BIG in CHINA

By what miracles of linguistic mastery and literary imagination could Chinese characters be made to capture Joyce’s mind-bending manipulations of the alphabet? By what subtleties of cross-cultural understanding could the specificities of Ireland and its mythologies be translated for a Chinese audience? — http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/jun/13/james-joyce-china-bloomsday-chinese-reputation

…the alphabet vs. the equation….?

Terence McKenna – Surfing Finnegan’s Wake

In late April 2000, San Francisco
possibly at 1015 Folsom
I joined Terence Mckenna’s
wake

today i miss Terence
and his wise
playful wordwhirl
languaging

late 20th century
modern teller of
the tale of the tribe:
Joyce and McLhuan
and Vico
here comes everybody…

R.I.P Terence. (November 16, 1946 – April 3, 2000)

Terence McKenna – Surfing Finnegan’s Wake

Pilot Plan for Concrete Poetry (1958)

Pilot Plan for Concrete Poetry (1958)
Augusto de Campos, Decio Pignatari, Haroldo de Campos: Brazil

From Concrete Poetry: A World View, 1968, ed Mary Ellen Solt

RELATED RESOURCES:
Haroldo de Campos in UbuWeb Historical
Augusto de Campos in UbuWeb Historical
Decio Pignatari in UbuWeb Historical
“Concrete Poetry: A World View : Brazil” in UbuWeb Papers
“The Imperative of Invention…” Charles A. Perrone
“Interview with Augusto de Campos” Roland Greene
“The Concrete Historical” Roland Greene
Sérgio Bessa “Architecture Versus Sound in Concrete Poetry”
“Speaking About Genre: the Case of Concrete Poetry” Victoria Pineda
“From (Command) Line to (Iconic) Constellation”, Kenneth Goldsmith

Concrete Poetry: product of a critical evolution of forms. Assuming that the historical cycle of verse (as formal-rhythmical unit) is closed, concrete poetry begins by being aware of graphic space as structural agent. Qualified space: space-time structure instead of mere linear-temporistical development. Hence the importance of ideogram concept, either in its general sense of spatial or visual syntax, or in its special sense (Fenollosa/ Pound) of method of composition based on direct-analogical, not logical-discursive juxtaposition of elements. “ll faut que notre intelligence s’habitue à comprendre synthético-idéographiquement au lieu de analytico -discursivement” (Apollinaire). Elsenstein: ideogram and montage.

Forerunners: Mallarmé (Un coup de dés, 1897): the first qualitative jump: “subdivisions prismatiques de l’idée”; space (“blancs”) and typographical devices as substantive elements of composition. Pound (The Cantos); ideogramic method.
Joyce (Ulysses and Finnegans Wake): word-ideogram; organic interpenetration of time and space. Cummings: atomization of words, physiognomical typography; expressionistic emphasis on space. Apollinaire (Calligrammes): the vision, rather than the praxis. Futurism, Dadaism: contributions to the life of the problem. In Brazil: Oswald de Andrade (1890-1954): “in pills, minutes of poetry. João Cabral de Melo Neto (born 1920—The Engineer and The Psychology of Composition plus Anti-Ode): direct speech, economy and functional architecture of verse.

Concrete Poetry: tension of things-words in space-time. Dynamic structure: multiplicity of concomitant movements. So in music-by, definition, a time art-space intervenes (Webern and his followers: Boulez and Stockhausen; concrete and electronic music); in visual arts-spatial, by definition-time intervenes (Mondrian and his Boogie-Woogie series; Max Bill; Albers and perceptive ambivalence; concrete art in general).

Ideogram: appeal to nonverbal communication. Concrete poem communicates its own structure: structure-content. Concrete poem is an object in and by itself, not an interpreter of exterior objects and/ or more or less subjective feelings. Its material word (sound, visual form, semantical charge). Its problem: a problem of functions-relations of this material.

Factors of proximity and similitude, gestalt psychology. Rhythm: relational force. Concrete poem, by using the phonetical system (digits) and analogical syntax, creates a specific linguistical area-“verbivocovisual” -which shares the advantages of nonverbal communication, without giving up word’s virtualities. With the concrete poem occurs the phenomenon of metacommunication: coincidence and simultaneity of verbal and nonverbal communication; only-it must be noted-it deals with a communication of forms, of a structure-content, not with the usual message communication.

Concrete Poetry aims at the least common multiple of language. Hence its tendency to nounising and verbification. “The concrete wherewithal of speech” (Sapir). Hence its affinities with the so-called isolating languages (Chinese): “The less outward grammar the Chinese language possesses, the more inner grammar inherent in it” (Humboldt via Cassirer). Chinese offers an example of pure relational syntax, based exclusively on word order (see Fenollosa, Sapir and Cassirer).

The conflict form-subject looking for identification, we call isomorphism. Parallel to form-subject isomorphism, there is a space-time isomorphisin, which creates movement. In a first moment of concrete poetry pragmatics, isomorphism tends to physiognomy, that is a movement imitating natural appearance (motion); organic form and phenomenology of composition prevail. In a more advanced stage, isomorphism tends to resolve itself into pure structural movement (movement properly said); at this phase, geometric form and mathematics of composition (sensible rationalism) prevail.

Renouncing the struggle for “absolute,” Concrete Poetry remains in the magnetic field of perennial relativeness. Chronomicro-metering of hazard. Control. Cybernetics. The poem as a mechanism regulating itself: feed-back. Faster communication (problems of functionality and structure implied) endows the poem with a positive value and guides its own making.

Concrete Poetry: total responsibility before language. Thorough realism. Against a poetry of expression, subjective and hedonistic. To create precise problems and to solve them in terms of sensible language. A general art of the word. The poem-product: useful object.


Note: Original printed without capitals. The “Pilot Plan for Concrete Poetry” presents a synthesis of the theoretical writings of the Noigandres group from 1950-58. The critical writings and manifestos of Augusto de Campos, Décio Pignatari and Haroldo de Campos have been collected in a volume: Teoria da Poesia Concreta, Textos Críticos e Manifestos 1950-1960, Sao Paulo, Ediçãoes Invenção, 1965.
Translated by the authors.

1958
(From Noigandres 4)

http://www.ubu.com/papers/noigandres01.html

Once lost now found James Joyce to see daylight

James Joyce’s ‘last undiscovered’ collection to be published

Ten ‘epiclets’ written after Ulysses in 1923, have been published together for the first time, causing a rift among scholars as to how they fit in to the Joyce canon

“Penned by Joyce in 1923, and described by the author as “epiclets”, the pieces range from vignettes or sketches to more substantial short stories or fables, said Ithys Press, which publishes the work as Finn’s Hotel this weekend – just in time for Bloomsday, the annual global celebration on 16 June of Joyce’s masterpiece, Ulysses.–http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/jun/14/james-joyce-collection-published

Joyce’s Voices by Bogus Magus (from Only Maybe blog)

Friday, June 01, 2012

Joyce’s Voices

For Bloomsday this year (16 June 2012) the BBC will be handing Radio 4 over to Ulysses. Throughout the day there will be readings of a special adaptation of the text, along with live broadcasts from Dublin (where fans re-enact moments from this complex book. Sadly, this may not prove accessible to all countries.

This will be an edited version, not the ‘complete’ text which was broadcast in 1982 (which took nearly 30 hours).

The details below are from the BBC Media Centre (without permission) which contains further information.

Here, at a glance, are the main Bloomsday broadcasts on Radio 4:

Part 1 09.00 – 10.30: Saturday Live From the Martello Tower to School
Sian and Richard present a special Bloomsday edition of the show, which will include the first three extracts from the drama as well as discussion and location reports, with input from Mark Lawson in Dublin.

Part 2 10.30 – 11.00 From Bloom’s House, through the Morning Streets, to a Funeral

Part 3 12.00 – 12.30 From the Beach, to a Newspaper Office, into Davy Byrne’s Pub

Part 4 14.30 – 15.30 The Library, Through the Lunchtime Streets, to the Ormond Hotel

Part 5 17.30 – 18.00 In Barney Kiernan’s Pub

Part 6 20.00 – 22.00 From Sandymount Beach at Evening, to the Maternity Hospital, and into Nighttown

22.15 – 23.00: Ulysses Today Mark Lawson chairs a discussion about the abiding popularity of Ulysses and its relevance today, with Declan Kiberd, author of Ulysses And Us – The Art Of Everyday Living; Professor Anne Fogarty, Director of the Dublin James Joyce Summer School; and others.

Part 7 23.00 – 00.00 From a Cab-man’s Shelter, to Eccles Street and Home

In the week before the Bloomsday broadcasts, Radio 4 and Radio 4 Extra will be broadcasting a number of programmes on the theme of Ulysses:

James Joyce had a fine singing voice and sang professionally as a young man. In James Joyce’s Playlist, David Owen Norris and guests will listen to some of Joyce’s favourite songs in the Martello Tower in Dublin where he lived for a time. This will be broadcast on Saturday, June 9th.

On Thursday, June 14th In Our Time will discuss the background to Ulysses, considering its historical and literary context, its themes, contents and style, and the impact it has had since publication. Melvyn Bragg will be joined by Steven Connor, Professor of Modern Literature and Theory at Birkbeck College, London; Jeri Johnson, Fellow and Tutor in English at Exeter College, Oxford; and Richard Brown, Reader in Modern Literature at the University of Leeds.

4Extra: Blind Date With Bloomsday – another chance to join Peter White on his Bloomsday visit to Dublin, during which he meets some enthusiastic celebrants. Friday, June 15th.

Grand Deft Mamalujo and Joycean computer games 2012

My google alert just alerted me to a New Yorker artcle by Mark O’Connell called ‘has James Joyce been set free?’ which overviews the recent changes and probable ramifications of the copyright expiring on some-but-not-all of his work.

Towards the end of the article Mark writes something very interesting to me, today, whereby he describes how his off-handed joke to a friend about a James Joyce first-person-shooter game, gestates into pipe-dreams about a Ulysses inspired game. A little bit like Grand Theft Auto, but set in a Joycean world.

Yes, yes, I say YES. This ‘Joycean computer game world’ might be the best idea, next to my own, of course, that I have heard this year so far…once again…Joycean computer games, or to explain a bit more precisely: the interactive visual translation of his languaging engine could lead us into a literary inspired exploration of great literature, a new way of reading, a whole new style, and have it begin with the great master and grand architect James Joyce.–Steve.

“Sean Latham agrees that there will now be somewhat less quality control on Joyce publications, but sees it as not such a terrible development, pointing out that no one is much concerned about there being too many editions of Dickens or Shakespeare. As with most advocates of Joyce’s work, he thinks anything that might bring it to a wider readership should be welcomed. When I made a joke about the possibility of a first-person-shooter video game of “Finnegans Wake” hitting the stores in 2012, he mentioned that he himself has had pipe dreams about a “Ulysses” game. “I have an undergraduate student,” he said, “and we fantasize about exactly how such a thing might be devised. I know there is a Jane Austen video game being designed, so a ‘Ulysses’ video game can’t be far behind.” If any game developers happen to be reading this, I hope they take note. A simulated ramble around Edwardian Dublin—a sort of Grand Theft Auto without the theft or the autos—could make for a powerfully immersive gaming experience. It would almost be worth doing just to see how Stephen Joyce might react.–

.”…and their farthing dip and read a letter or two every night before going to sleep in the twilight, a capitaletter for further auspices on their old one page codex book of old year’s eve 1132, M.M.L.J. old style, their Senchus Mor by Mrs Shemans, final buff lunch edition, and Lally through their gangrene spentacles and all the good they did in their time for Roe and O’Mulconry a Conry ap Mul or Lap ap Morion and Buffler ap Matty Mac Gregory for Marcus on Podex by Daddy de Wyer, old bagabroth, and one by one and sing a mamalujo.–James Joyce, the Mamalujo vignette, taken from an early draft of Finnegans Wake.

Joyce Pound Shaw and Ulysses in Porno-mags

SNIPPET FROM: An end to bad heir days: The posthumous power of the literary estate

By Gordon Bowker

The question of rights in Joyce’s work was a fraught one even during his lifetime. Fearing prosecution, no one would publish Ulysses complete and unabridged until Sylvia Beach, the American bookseller in Paris, bravely did so in 1922. But Joyce’s notoriety attracted pirates , and at one time he was unprotected by good contracts or good law. In November 1925, he found that without his permission Ulysses was being published serially in the magazine Two Worlds by Samuel Roth, the New York pornographer. His protests went unheeded. Roth simply sent a cheque for $1000 which Joyce refused to cash.

Among his literary friends and supporters, only Ezra Pound and Bernard Shaw were unsympathetic. Pound said that Joyce had only himself to blame for not registering his copyright in America. He advised him “to write letters to the press denouncing Roth”, or alternatively, “organise a gang of gunmen to scare [him] out of his pants”. But Roth, he warned, was a ruthless capitalist driven by avarice, not easily stopped.

Joyce was incensed, and with the aid of friends composed a letter of protest which was circulated among writers, attacking unjust American copyright law. Pound refused to sign, as did Shaw, who suspected a Joycean stunt.

READ ON HERE

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/features/an-end-to-bad-heir-days-the-posthumous-power-of-the-literary-estate-6285277.html